Butternut Squash, Bacon, Onion, and Spinach Quiche


I have a horrible habit of buying butternut or acorn squash and then letting it decompose on our kitchen countertop without ever using it. Grandiose ideas always dance in my head when I happily add it to my shopping cart at the grocery store. “I will carve this butternut squash into a festive turkey, roast it, and drizzle it with a balsamic reduction,” I tell myself. “It will serve as the centerpiece for our thanksgiving meal and it will become so beloved, that it will evolve into a tradition that I pass down to my children’s children and we will call it the Gobbler Gourd.” The voice narrating the regal scene I am imagining suddenly develops a hybrid accent of British/Australian/West Virginian because I have never been good with linguistics, even in my dreams. And then I make it through the checkout line, struggle to find my car keys, load a crying and hungry Smith into his car seat, pull in the garage, and drop half of the groceries on the floor before I see the butternut squash again and wonder if our sheep or chickens will eat the rotting blob it will surely become. “Surely the grocery store used some sort of trickery to force me to buy it,” I surmise. In the moment, I second guess whether or not we actually enjoy the taste of squash.

The particular butternut squash I used in this recipe was destined for a similar fate of those before it, but I decided it was time to stop being so wasteful and find some new ways to incorporate this ingredient into our weeknight meals. The idea for a quiche quickly came to my mind as we had a surplus of eggs from our hens and I needed to make a few batches of pie dough for the upcoming Turkey Day celebration. I turned to my new favorite book, America’s Test Kitchen Cooking School, and followed the guidelines for making quiche and then added some extra jazziness to it. By the way- if you don’t have this book and would like to learn some classic cooking techniques, I highly recommend it. I adore everything ATK produces and this publication did not disappoint.


In addition to the butternut squash, I used ingredients that I had on hand that I thought would go well together. Because I was going to be serving this for dinner, I added bacon to it to appeal to some of the other members of my household. I like to think the new reports on the health risks of cured meat are mitigated if one consumes good quality bacon and makes sure to incorporate plenty of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables in one’s diet. But maybe that’s just me.

Soapbox aside, the quiche was a surprising hit for our family. Though Robert is always very kind and gracious when I make new recipes, I could see the flash of what I like to call “meat insecurity” shoot across his eyes when he saw what was for dinner. It only took a single bite to reassure him. Poor guy.  I only wish I would have thought of this sooner, but I was so glad I was able to at least save this butternut squash from a sad ending.

Happy Saturday, all!


Butternut Squash, Bacon, Onion, and Spinach Quiche

Yield: 1 9″ quiche


  • 1 1/2 cups butternut squash, chopped into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 6 strips bacon, chopped into small pieces
  • 1 medium onion, sliced lengthwise in thin strips
  • 1 cup loosely packed spinach, roughly chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 5 eggs
  • 1 cup freshly shredded Swiss cheese
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 single layer pie crust
  • Olive oil, butter


  1. Press pie dough into 9 inch pie pan. Cover with plastic wrap and place in freezer for 30 minutes.  While the dough chills, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil and 1 tablespoon of butter in a large, nonstick sauté pan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the squash and onions and cook until tender, about 15 minutes. Add in the garlic and heat until fragrant, about 1 minute longer. Add the spinach and cook until wilted, for about 1 more minute. Remove from heat and set aside. Meanwhile, whisk together the milk, eggs, salt, and pepper. Add the shredded cheese and sautéed vegetables to the custard mix. Set aside.
  2. After the dough has been chilled, preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Place aluminum foil over pie crust and secure down with pie weights. Blind bake crust just until lightly golden, about 15 minutes. Remove the crust from the oven and place on a cooling rack. Reduce the heat of the oven to 350 degrees. Remove the aluminum foil and pie weights and transfer pie pan to a rimmed baking sheet. Place the baking sheet back in the oven and carefully pour the custard mix into the pie crust, making sure to leave 1/2 room between top of the custard and edges of the pie crust. Moving the baking sheet to the oven before adding the custard prevents the custard from spilling all over the place if you add it before you move the baking sheet to the oven.
  3. Bake the quiche until puffed and lightly golden brown, about 40-50 minutes. Remove from oven and place on cooling rack and allow to set for 1-3 hours before serving.

Note: You may have extra custard depending on the depth of your pie pan. I used the extra I had to bake egg cups in standard muffin tins (I baked these for about 18 minutes) and they were great for breakfasts on the go.

Source: Method for preparing quiche from America’s Test Kitchen Cooking School

Chicken Shawarma


Because I grew up in the country, I didn’t have a large variety of cuisine to sample from. The standard spices in the recipes of my Midwestern region tend to be salt, pepper, and sugar. Lots of sugar. While I love the delicious food I grew up with, and I still make a lot of those traditional recipes, I didn’t really know beauty of other cuisine until Robert and I moved to Columbus. As with most larger cities in America, Columbus is a melting pot of cultures and nationalities. This means there is a plethora of ethnic restaurants just waiting to inspire the taste buds of diners. I was introduced to spices like turmeric, saffron, and garam masala. It was educational and delicious all in one.


Perhaps our favorite discovery, though, was The Olive Tree in Hilliard. It was at this Mediterranean restaurant that we found the magic of chicken shawarma. Shawarma, by definition (thanks to a quick, highly technical google search), refers to the method of preparing meat by roasting it in a vertical, rotisserie-type of device called a spit.  It’s also often served with hummus or tahini and eaten with pita. I think I originally ordered this because it reminded me of the post-credits scene in the movie The Avengers, but not even the acting skills or Robert Downey Jr. could have prepared me for the deliciousness that was served. A gorgeous medley of amazingly-seasoned chicken and vegetables were sitting atop a silky swirl of creamy homemade hummus and accompanied by pillowy soft pita. Robert and I were both hooked and there was a fabulous stretch of time when we ordered take-out from The Olive Tree about once a week because we had shawarma fever.


It’s fun and exciting to try new foods. It adds to a richer experience in life and it broadens one’s worldview. Just as we have the ability to evolve and mature as individuals, we have the ability to allow our tastebuds to do the same. Now more than ever, we have access to previously hard-to-find ingredients and there are millions and millions of incredible recipes at our fingertips thanks to the Internet. I’ve happily added this chicken shawarma recipe to our family’s rotation of meals. It’s a great way to shake up the classics and it has actually become a meal that I would classify as a comfort food. It reminds me of many convivial moments dining with friends and family and it nourishes both the body and the soul.



Chicken Shawarma


  • 2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 4 bell peppers, julienned
  • 1 large red onion, sliced thinly lengthwise
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 4 teaspoons cumin
  • 4 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 teaspoon allspice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Pinch of cayenne
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Hummus
  • Pita bread
  • Feta cheese, optional
  • Fresh basil/cilantro, optional


  1. Make two separate batches of the marinade: in 2 separate small bowls, whisk together 1/4 cup olive oil, 2teaspoons cumin, 2 teaspoons paprika, 1/2 teaspoon all spice, 3/4 teaspoon turmeric, 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, pinch of cayenne, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Place chicken in a zip-loc bag or bowl and pour one of the bowls over the chicken. Ensure the pieces are coated evenly and refrigerate for 1 hour or overnight. Cover other bowl of marinade and set aside to used for vegetables.
  2. Grill the chicken: heat grill to medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook until internal temperature reaches 165 degrees. Transfer chicken to a plate and cover with aluminum foil and allow meat to rest for 10 minutes.
  3. Sauté the vegetablesAdd about 1 tablespoon of olive oil to a large skillet and heat over medium-high heat. When skillet is hot, add the peppers and onion and the other bowl of marinade. Stir the mixture with a wooden spoon to ensure vegetables are evenly coated. Turn down the heat of the stove to medium and cook until peppers and onions are soft, about 10-15 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Plate and enjoy: After the chicken rests, cut into strips. Swirl a generous amount of hummus on a plate or bowl. Add a scoop of the sautéed vegetables and then a few pieces of chicken. Top with feta cheese and fresh basil or cilantro. Serve with pita bread. Enjoy!

Source: Tori Avey


Savory Butternut Squash Bisque


That distinct Ohio Autumn crispness has floated into the morning air the past two days and it has sparked in me a fierce urge to cook and bake. The summer humidity always dampens my desire to be in my kitchen, but my oven and stove were working overtime this past Sunday afternoon.  Our house temperature rose to a stifling 76 degrees, but whatever. It was fun, albeit steamy.

One of my weekend projects was this soup.  I had scooped up a hefty butternut squash at the grocery store without any recipe in mind last week. This, unfortunately, tends to result in me throwing out a rotting squash because no plans come to fruition and I always vow to waste less “next time.” But then the vision of a silky and earthy butternut squash soup danced in my head and I was researching recipes in no time.


I have a personal preference for savory spices with starchier vegetables like sweet potatoes or butternut squash. They are already sweet to begin with and I think adding spices like cinnamon and nutmeg makes these types of dishes seem more like a dessert. As a result, I added thyme to this bisque instead. The addition of flavorful leeks and sherry really make this soup extra lovely. Sherry is one of the best ways to take a creamy soup up about 50 notches. It adds a whole new dimension and richness. I highly recommend using it if you can; plus- it lasts forever! I think the sherry I have was originally my great grandmother’s and my mom gave it to me when my parents were moving.

If you are in the mood for soups and you are in the autumn spirit, I highly recommend making this soup. It makes a great side dish and is wonderful topped with crème fraiche and good balsamic vinegar. You could also make it a main dish and jazz it up with a few crumbles of thick bacon. Either way, I don’t think you can go wrong.

Happy Tuesday, everyone.


Looking for more soup recipes? Here are a few of our favorite soup recipes from the archives:

Wedding Crab (or Lobster) Bisque- the beloved soup recipe served at our wedding (sherry is in this recipe, too!)

Sweet Potato Chili– a healthy and hearty soup with no added sugar

Copycat Panera Broccoli Cheese– creamy and rich

Corn Chowder– all of the flavor of summer before we say goodbye

Crab and Corn Chowder– shellfish and corn go together like peas and carrots

Sweet and Spicy Chili– a little sweet and a little heat make for a classic soup

Cream of Mushroom– earthy and satisfying

French Onion Soup– let’s be real, the best part is the cheesy bread on top

Chicken Tortilla Soup– for those who want a little extra spice in their lives

P.S. We have three new ladies in our family: Ruth, Idgie, and Sipsey. They are Rhode Island Red laying hens and we love getting fresh eggs every day. Fresh eggs are so much richer and more flavorful than those found in the grocery store and one of our girls is a double-yolk-laying machine.


Savory Butternut Squash Bisque

Yield: About 6 side dish servings


  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large leek, white and light green part only, chopped and rinsed well (about 1 cup total)
  • 1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cubed
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup dry sherry
  • 3cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • Crème fraiche and balsamic vinegar for topping, optional


  1. Melt the butter in a Dutch oven. Add in the leaks and cook until softened, about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  2. Add in the squash, thyme, black pepper, and salt. Stir and cook for an additional 5 minutes, continuing to stir frequently. Add in the sherry and cook for about 2 minutes longer to allow the liquid to reduce.
  3. Pour in the chicken stock, stir and bring to a boil. Reduce hit to a simmer, cover, and cook for about 20 minutes or until squash is tender.
  4. Using a hand blender or regular blender, blend the soup until desired texture is achieved  (I personally like a few chunks and bits left). Return the soup mixture to the Dutch oven. Add in the milk, cream, and any additional salt or sherry as your personal taste indicates. Stir to combine and reheat to desired temperature.
  5. Ladle soup into bowls. Top with a dollop of crème fraiche and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar. Enjoy!


Source: Slightly adapted from Merrill Stubbs at Food52

Oven-Roasted Salmon Salad with Honey Dijon Vinaigrette


I made this salad a few months ago when my friend Jamie came over for lunch and I have been meaning to share the recipe for several weeks. My father travels to Alaska about once every two months to help provide orthodontic services at a local clinic. One of the clinic coordinators is a big time fisherman and he invited my dad, who is also a seasoned fisherman, along on an excursion. This resulted in a large haul of King and Coho salmon being shipped back to our midwestern homestead and we have been reaping the benefits ever since.

This salad is highly adaptable. On the particular day I made it, I was in the mood to dress it with pumpkin seeds, goat cheese, fresh strawberries, and roasted pecans; but I would recommend jazzing it up with whatever is in season. We still have a surplus of salmon in our freezer right now (and we enjoyed another great salmon recipe over the weekend), so there is some more salmon coming your way!

I hope you all had a wonderful holiday weekend.

Happy Monday!


Smith sure loves our buddy, Jamie. 

Honey Dijon Vinaigrette 


  • 1 clove garlic, peeled & minced
  • 2/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoons dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • salt and pepper, to taste


Mix or shake all ingredients together until well-blended.

Oven-Roasted Salmon 


  • 1 to 3 pounds skin-on salmon fillets (8 ounces per person)
  • Olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper


  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a roasting pan or baking sheet with foil.
  2. Pat the salmon dry with a paper towel. Transfer to the foil-lined baking sheet. Rub the top of the salmon with oil so that it’s lightly coated. Sprinkle each fillet generously with salt and pepper.
  3. Place the salmon in the oven and roast for 4-6 minutes per half inch thickness of fillet. The salmon will easily flake with a fork when finished (the USDA recommends a minimum internal temperature of 145°F at the thickest part of the fillet).
  4. Remove from oven and place over bed of greens. Garnish the salad with dried cherries, fresh strawberries, goat cheese and pumpkin seeds. Drizzle with honey dijon vinaigrette and serve immediately.

Source: Dressing: adapted from Food Network; Salmon: The Kitchn 


Food Memory Friday: Blackened Chicken with Black Bean and Corn Salsa


The summer Robert and I were married, I was finishing up my physics pre-requisite for graduate school and my schedule allowed me extra time to cook for us each night. Those were the days. I was able to work out every morning and I happily perused cookbooks and magazines for menu ideas. I also consulted with my mother a lot as I tried to figure out my way around the kitchen and she introduced me to this recipe. She’d made it a few times before and it was a delicious hit. Feeling confident, I collected the ingredients I needed. I was happy to find that I already had everything in our apartment. The chicken breasts I was using were frozen, but I figured if I allowed them to thaw for a few hours, I would be in good shape by the time I was ready to make dinner.

Fast forward a few hours and I followed the recipe to a tee. The kitchen smelled wonderful as the food baked in the oven and it looked gorgeous as I ceremoniously placed dinner on our table. We each served ourselves a piece of chicken and dug in. A few bites in, Robert turned his fork upside down and examined the piece of chicken pierced through its prongs closely. “This chicken is really chewy,” he said, “is there something different about it?” I assured him that it was the usual chicken I always purchased and I took his plate to check it out myself. I cut the chicken in half and scraped the salsa away to reveal a delightfully raw piece of chicken. The center was still cold and nowhere near the safe temperature recommended. My heart sank and I apologized profusely. Bert reassured me we could just pop the chicken in the microwave, which we did, but we both had not-surprisingly lost our appetites by that point. On the bright side- neither of us ended up with any food-borne illnesses and I learned a very valuable lesson in defrosting chicken that day.


Here we are nearly eight years later and I still make this dish a few times a year. Every time I do,  it seems like one of us will bring up that chewy chicken I served just a few weeks after we became a family. We laugh and then we both furtively check our chicken to make sure it is indeed cooked through.


Blackened Chicken with Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Yield: 4 generous servings


  • 15 oz can (1 1/2 cups) black beans, drained
  • 15 oz can (1 1/2 cups) corn, drained
  • 1 cup salsa
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 cup sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
  • Olive or coconut oil
  • Sour cream, green onions, avocado, tortilla chips (optional)


1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the black beans, corn, and salsa in a 9×13 inch casserole dish. Set aside.

2. Combine the chili powder, garlic, salt, and cumin in a bowl and pour into a thin layer on a plate. Dip each of the chicken breasts in the spice mixture and use your fingers to “massage” the rub evenly on each piece of chicken.

3. Heat olive or coconut over medium-high heat in a large saucepan until hot. Carefully add each piece of chicken to the pan and sear the chicken on each side, until blackened, about 2-3 minutes each. Transfer the pieces of chicken to the casserole dish with the black bean and corn salsa. Bake for 40 minutes. Remove from oven and top with shredded cheese and other toppings, as desired.

Source: Taste of Home


Sweet Potato Chili


I love the above picture. Little Smee is so curious these days and he couldn’t let me snap a quick photo of dinner without checking out why I was pulling the window blinds up and grabbing my camera. Luckily, my reflexes have sharpened and I was able to quickly snatch the soup away from his curious hands (don’t worry- the soup was already pretty cool at this point due to a toddler meltdown distracting me).


I’ve been on a big sweet potato kick as of late. In particular, savory sweet potato dishes. My new favorite breakfast consists of a sweet potato hash topped with two eggs and my current preferred work lunch is this delightful chili. It’s loaded with a healthy dose of vegetables, it’s flavorful, and it prevents me from turning into a hangry grouch by late afternoon. This recipe is highly adaptable and can easily be turned into a vegetarian dish if that is what is desired. Another bonus is that this chili freezes really well and is a great option for a last minute dinner.

If you’re looking to mix up your lunch routine or are in the mood for one final round of soup before the warm weather is here to stay (maybe?), look no further.


Sweet Potato Chili

Yield: 8-10 servings


  • 1 lb lean ground beef or turkey
  • 2 sweet potatoes, chopped into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 28oz can diced tomatoes
  • 28oz can tomato sauce
  • 1 quart (4 cups) low sodium chicken stock
  • 2 cups (about 1 can) black beans
  • 2 cups (about 1 can) corn


1. Heat a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the ground beef and cook until brown. Drain to remove excess grease. Place the cooked beef into a separate sale and set aside.

2. Add the sweet potatoes, onion, and green pepper to the Dutch oven. Cook, stirring occasionally until the vegetables are softened, about 10 minutes. Next stir in the minced garlic and cook for about 1 minute longer.

3. Add the chili powder, cumin, salt, pepper, bay leaves, tomatoes, tomato sauce, chicken stock, beans, and corn. Bring the soup to a boil. Once boiling, reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 2-3 hours to allow flavors to fully develop.

4. Top with sour cream, cheese, and green onions, if desired.

Source: Adapted from A Couple Cooks

French Onion Soup

I’m posting a recipe for soup in an effort to bring on warmer weather. You see, it seems inevitable that whenever I get ahead of myself, I end up putting my foot in my mouth. I was tempted to “think spring” and write about asparagus, but I know it would backfire and we would end up with snow in May. Kind of similar to the time I was talking to some of my friends that have babies younger than Smith and I told them that infant sleeping gets better. “Smith was sleeping through the night by six months; the waking up in the middle of the night will be over before you know it,” I told them with a sense of relief and achievement. What a foolish, foolish mother I was.


It turns out there is a wee little thing called sleep regression that tends to pop up when the little ones hit new motor milestones. The sleeping gets better, but then it takes a wild turn and you find yourself sprawled out on the floor of your baby’s room with your hand wedged inside his crib at 3:30am. It’s a humbling time. As a result, I’m embracing the cold with this French onion soup to coax the number on the thermometer upward.


French onion soup combines two of the world’s most glorious ingredients, melted cheese and caramelized onions, to make a special  lunch or a great main dish for dinner time. It warms the stomach and the soul.


French Onion Soup

Yield: 4-6 servings


  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 4 onions, sliced lengthwise
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 fresh thyme sprigs
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 3 heaping tablespoons flour
  • 2 quarts beef broth
  • Loaf of artisan bread (or whichever bread you prefer)
  • 1/2 lb sharp swiss cheese, shredded


1. Melt the stick of butter in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onions, garlic, bay leaves, thyme, and salt and pepper and sauté until the onions are very soft and caramelized, about 25 minutes.

2. Add the wine, bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer until the wine has evaporated and the onions are dry, about 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and sprigs of thyme.

3. Sprinkle the onions with the flour and stir to ensure the onions are well-coated. Turn the heat down to medium low so the flour doesn’t burn, and cook for 10 minutes .

4. Add the beef broth, bring the soup back to a simmer, and cook for 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

5. When you’re ready to eat, preheat the broiler. Arrange the bread slices on a baking sheet in a single layer. Sprinkle the slices with the swiss cheese and broil until bubbly and golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes.

6. Ladle the soup in bowls and add the toasted bread slices to the top. Serve immediately.

Source: Tyler Florence 

Copycat Panera Broccoli Cheese Soup


We’re in the middle of a big snow storm here in Ohio and I always look forward to the days when we can stay bundled up inside and watch the flakes fall. I often conjure up these images in my head of curling up on the couch by the fireplace while we sip on warm drinks and read.  Of course, my imagination and reality sometimes conflict, especially since we don’t even have a fireplace and Smith is currently boycotting naps and battling a bad case of the grumps as a result. There are books, though. Lots and lots of lift-the-flap board books that our boy loves to read over and over and over. Spoiler alert: the Hungry Caterpillar turns into a butterfly.

For the days when the weather is frightfully cold, a bowl of soup is the perfect antidote. This broccoli cheese soup is especially comforting with its thick, creamy base and satisfying chunks of broccoli and carrots. A little bit goes a long way. Add in a hunk of fresh bread and it’s a lovely winter meal.

I hope you are all staying warm. We’re ready to go sledding!


Copycat Panera Broccoli Cheese Soup

Yield: 4 servings


  • 1 tablespoon melted butter
  • ½ medium chopped onion
  • ¼ cup melted butter
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 2 cups half-and-half (or 1 cup cream, 1 cup milk)
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • ½ lb fresh broccoli (about 1 cup), chopped
  • 1 cup carrot, finely chopped
  • 8 ounces grated sharp cheddar cheese (it’s best to shred your own since pre-shredded cheese is coated with cornstarch or flour, which impacts thickness)
  • salt and pepper to taste



  1. Saute the onion in 1 tablespoon melted butter and set aside. In a large pot whisk together the melted butter and flour over medium heat for about 3-4 minutes.
  2. Slowly whisk in the half and half and chicken stock. Let it simmer for about 20 minutes.
  3. Add the broccoli, carrots, and onions. Let them simmer on medium low for about 25 minutes until the broccoli and carrots are tender.
  4. Add salt and pepper and sharp cheddar cheese. Allow the cheese to melt. Remove from heat. Use an immersion blender (or a regular blender) to puree some of the soup until you achieve your desired smoothness.

Source: The Recipe Critic



Homestead Living: How to Make Homemade Pizza



If there’s a food I can eat every week (maybe even everyday), it’s pizza. There are so many variations that it’s hard to tire of it. Plus, who doesn’t love melty, bubbly cheese and chewy bread?

A few years ago, Robert bought me a pizza stone and a pizza peel after we discovered the life-changing book, Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. We made a lot of bread; but then we decided to start dabbling with homemade pizza. We experimented with several different oven temperatures and doughs as well as different methods of getting the pizza onto the stone. This involved making a lot of pizza and also creepily watching the chefs in the kitchens of pizza joints when we went out to eat. It was a pretty rough assignment. And by pretty rough, I mean it was glorious.

I’m happy to report that all of that “hard work” has paid off and Bert and I are now able to make delicious pizza in our own kitchen. It’s fast, easy, economical, and i think I may even prefer our version to take out. I usually make a batch of dough about once every 2 weeks and leave it in the fridge for nights where I don’t have as much time to prepare a meal. On those nights, I grab whatever ingredients we have on hand and make a pizza pie for us to enjoy. That’s amore, my friends.

In order to make the best homemade pizza, you will need to invest in a good ceramic pizza stone. This really is key. You can get away with not having a pizza peel, but the stone is crucial. It allows the pizza crust to start baking as soon as that dough hits the hot stone and it provides you with that fabulous, chewy bread base that we all crave. I also like to use parchment paper underneath the pizza when I transport it onto the stone. I’ve tried putting cornmeal on the peel, but it ended in a calzone-gone-bad tragedy 9 times out of 10. I just decided to play it safe and keep the parchment paper handy. And, as I stated above, you don’t need a pizza peel if you don’t want one. You can transport the pizza to the stone using a cookie sheet or cutting board as long as you keep the parchment paper underneath.

Once you have your stone, you are ready to start making your very own scrumptious homemade pizza! I promise you you won’t be disappointed.



First up…. You have to make the dough. And it couldn’t be easier. Here is the no-knead recipe we love:

Olive Oil Dough


  • 1 1/2 tablespoons active dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 3/4 cup lukewarm, NOT HOT,  water (I microwave mine for 1 minute in the microwave)
  • 6  1/2 cups all-purpose, unbleached flour


Place the yeast, salt, sugar, olive oil, and water in a large plastic bowl (I use a 1 gallon Rubbermaid container with a lid).


Next, add in the 6 1/2 cups of flour. I have substituted whole wheat flour for the all-purpose flour in the past, but I found the taste is best if you use half whole wheat flour and half white flour if you are looking for a little extra nutrition in your pizza crust.


Use a wooden spoon to give all the ingredients a good stir until the dough starts to come together. It’s okay if a few clumps of flour remain. It usually takes me about 20-25 stirs of the spoon to get the right consistency. You will need to use a little elbow grease, but it will be worth it!


Lightly place a lid on the container on the dough. Don’t seal it completely. Allow the dough to rest for 2-5 hours in a warm, dry area. I always allow my dough to rise on our kitchen countertop, away from the sink. The dough will puff up and start to press on the lid. At this point, you can either fasten the lid and refrigerate the dough for a later time or you can use the dough immediately.


When you are ready to use the dough, dust your hands with flour and take a grapefuit-sized hunk from the bowl. Use one hand to grab a small handful of flour and then dust or “cloak” the dough with flour and smooth it into a ball. Place the ball of dough on a sheet of parchment paper and allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes (if you are using the dough right after you let it rise, you don’t need to let the dough rest and you can proceed to shaping it right away). The resting allows the dough to warm up, which makes it less elastic and easier to stretch into a beautiful base.


While the dough rests, place your pizza stone in the oven and preheat the oven for a solid 20 minutes. If you are using a standard “bake” setting on an oven, preheat to 515 degrees. If you are using a “convection” setting, preheat to 485 degrees. These may seem like really high temperatures and you may be concerned that your oven is going to explode, but the temperature is the key to getting a great crust. I recommend using an oven thermometer to ensure the temperature you are setting your oven on is correct. You’d be surprised how inaccurate some appliances can be.



While the oven is preheating and your dough is resting, you can prepare your toppings. Get creative- the possibilities are endless!


Once the dough has rested, it’s time to assemble your pizza pie. Shaping the dough can take some practice. The important thing to remember is to respect the dough. Don’t fight it. If you start trying to stretch it and it is still pretty elastic or you are tearing holes in it, carefully mold the dough back into a ball, and place it back down on the parchment paper and let it rest for a little longer. The more your work the dough, the more the gluten develops and it can cause a tough crust if you get overzealous. If the dough is sticky, you can always dust your hands or the dough with more flour.

There are a few ways you can stretch the dough. You can hold the ball between your hands and gently let gravity pull the dough downward and then you can carefully turn the dough, kind of like your are turning a steering wheel. You can also stretch the dough a little bit and then drape it over your fists and then gently pull the dough outward with your knuckles and even flip the dough in the air (this never ends well for me). Or, if you are wanting to ease into the dough-making business, you can just push the dough out into a disc on the parchment paper and then tug it outward until you achieve your desired base.

Always leave more dough at the edge as this will be your crust!


Next up, add your sauce. Tomato-based, pesto, ranch dressing, olive oil, whatever tickles your fancy.


Then, add the cheese and toppings. Again, get crazy. This your pie!


Once all the toppings are on and the oven has preheated, it’s time to bake the pizza. Slide a pizza peel or a cookie sheet underneath the parchment paper and pizza. Open the oven and carefully transport the pizza (with the parchment paper) onto the stone. I’ve found it easiest to do this by getting the pizza peel (or cookie sheet) as close to the stone as possible and at about a 45 degree angle. Then, you flick the wrist that’s holding the peel to scooch the pizza and parchment onto the stone. Again, you can try to do this sans parchment paper. A lot of people use cornmeal, but I’ve never had a lot of luck getting the pizza perfectly onto the stone without the parchment paper. The parchment can withstand high heat and it won’t impact the way the pizza bakes.

Note: parchment paper and wax paper are NOT the same thing! Wax paper will melt onto your pizza at these temperatures. 

If you are using the “bake” setting at 515 degrees, bake for 12-13 minutes. If you are using the “convect” setting, set the timer for 10-11 minutes. You’ll know the pizza is done when the cheese is brown and bubbly and the crust is a golden hue.

When you are ready to take the pizza out of the oven. Use you the peel (or cookie sheet) and place the tip on the edge of the stone and carefully tug the parchment paper and slide the pizza onto the peel completely. Remove, allow to cool, and cut into slices. Enjoy!

Congratulations, you just made homemade pizza. :)


Source: Dough from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

The Amish “Monte Cristo”


For all the food purists out there, I want to start by saying I understand this sandwich is not a true Monte Cristo. A Monte Cristo (based on my dining history and a quick google search), is a ham/turkey and cheese sandwich that is dipped in an egg/milk batter and then pan fried like French toast and served with jam. It is a delightful combination of sweet and savory and a fabulous Sunday brunch meal.

This version has not been dipped in a batter, but it contains the other components and I thought it wouldn’t upset the food gods too much if I deemed it the Amish Monte Cristo.

What makes it Amish, you may ask? Well, all of the ingredients come from an Amish origin. Not only did I grow up in an area that has a dense population of Amish; but there is a small settlement of Amish about 20 minutes west of Columbus in Plain City. On my days off of work, I sometimes venture out west to stock up on a few items. The bread, ham, and cheese all come from an Amish Farmer’s market in Plain City. The apples are from an orchard back in my hometown; and the apple butter was made by my in-laws, who share a family tree with this unique group of people.

The good news is you don’t have to have super magical Amish ingredients to make this sandwich. Just some good (as Ina Garten would say) ham, cheese, apple butter, apples, and bread. It’s a fast and tasty way to dress up a boring ham and cheese sandwich on cold Fall nights.

Amish Monte Cristo


1. Spread a generous amount of apple butter on 2 slices of bread


2. Layer one slice of bread with thinly sliced apples of your choice (I used Honeycrisp)


3. Top with ham and swiss cheese.


4. Grill in a lightly-buttered, heated pan until the cheese is melted.


5. Enjoy!